Mitt Romney

In debate finale, Romney rules out investing in clean energy companies

In their final debate Monday night, President Barack Obama was unmistakably on offense, but offered few new energy policy details. Mitt Romney, on the other hand, was decidedly muted in tone but offered new insights on his plans for clean energy investment and sanctioning Iran's oil industry.

Romney made some news during a defense of his 2008 call for the Big Three automakers to go through bankruptcy without a taxpayer bailout, saying he opposes "investing" in energy sector companies. Such a position would rule out future loan guarantees.

Oil

Gas prices fall in key swing states

Source: 
The Hill

Gas prices are dropping at a faster rate in Ohio and several other swing states, providing some relief to the Obama campaign, The Hill reports.

Romney rules out taxpayer investments in energy companies

In the final presidential debate, Republican presidential challenger Mitt Romney declared Monday night he would oppose direct government investments in clean energy and other private companies, his most forceful response yet to the Solyndra bankruptcy that cast a shadow over federal loan guarantees.

Drawing contrasts with President Barack Obama, Romney suggested his support for clean energy support would be limited to technology research and not aiding specific companies. "We're going to have to have a president, however, that doesn't think that somehow the government investing in car companies like Tesla and Fisker, making electric battery cars, this is not research, Mr. President," Romney said.

Obama campaign responds to climate criticism

Source: 
The Hill

Responding to attacks that President Obama has failed to give proper attention to climate change, the Obama campaign sent an email to environmental groups noting the instances that the president has addressed the issue, The Hill reports.

Mitt Romney, Barack Obama/Obama for America Photo

Third debate takes Obama, Romney away from domestic energy fight

The third and final debate between President Barack Obama and challenger Mitt Romney on Monday night is being billed as a foreign policy discussion, which seems natural to cause a tussle over global oil supplies and U.S. foreign oil dependence.

But with Romney focused in recent days on the attack on the U.S. consulate in  Benghazi, Libya, and Obama ready to tout his record of ending the wars in Iran and Afghanistan and killing of Osama bin Laden, watch for energy to play at best a supporting role to bigger arguments.

Oil

Oil subsidies may face GOP threats

Source: 
Politico

Republicans may be joining the ranks of Democrats in calling for cuts to oil subsidies after the election, Politico reports. House Energy and Commerce Chairman Rep. Fred Upton, R-Mich., most notably argued that the subsidies should be eliminated completely.

Wind credit indecision hurts GE revenues

Source: 
The Hill

General Electric energy infrastructure revenues dropped 5 percent in the third quarter due to uncertainty about the renewal of a wind energy tax credit, The Hill reports.

Colorado paper highlights energy in Obama endorsement

Source: 
The Denver Post

In its endorsement of President Obama published Friday, The Denver Post bashed Mitt Romney's energy plan, saying that it "runs counter to the predominant view in Colorado, which is one that balances energy and environment."

Obama, Romney struggle with energy efficiency issue

Source: 
Forbes

Despite the potential savings tied to energy efficiency policies, both President Obama and Mitt Romney have largely punted the issue during their campaigns and their debates, Forbes reports.

Veterans urge GOP leaders to renew wind tax credit

Source: 
The Hill

Military veterans employed by the wind energy industry have scored meetings with a number of Republican leaders, including House Majority Leader Eric Cantor and Sen. Rob Portman, to push for the extension for a wind tax credit, The Hill reports.

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