How to Have a Successful Pump Packing System

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How to Have a Successful Pump Packing System

It is important to understand the correct way to install and adjust your pump packing system. Understanding, or not understanding, how to do the procedure correctly could end in a success or failure. There are a few key elements to the procedure that will enable you to have a successful experience.

Remove Old Packing
The hardest step in the process is getting rid of old packing. It is important to get to the bottom of all the way down to the bottom of the stuffing box. If there is a lantern ring, make sure you remove that as well. There are normally sharp ends in the packing removal tools. Make sure that these ends do not puncture the shaft or any surfaces.

Inspect the Packing
After removal, it is time to check out the equipment of the condition. It is important that you record the time it takes to do this so that it will make the process smoother in the future if the equipment needs to be serviced. If there is visible wear on the surface, it should be resurfaced or replaced. The bore diameter also needs to be sealed.

Take Measurements and Observations
During the process, it is important to take measurements of the box depth, shift diameter, and bore diameter. If a flush injection has been used, you should then measure the length of the whole lantern ring as well as the flush port. A short wire will work to measure the location of the flush port.

Cut and Install
Once the previous process is done, the packing should be cut. Packing should be cut into ring sized pieces where the ends of the rings can fit together without a gap in between. Once the rings are inserted they should fit nicely into the bottom portion of the stuffing box. This will ensure that the load is compressed within the depth of the packing. There are different types of materials that can be used for tamping tools. Some of these materials include, but are not limited to, split tubing, metallic bushings, and certain types of cardboard. Do not forget to take these tools away before the next ring is put into place.

Adjust
For most situations with pump packing, it is imperative that there is some liquid leakage. This ensures that lubrication will cool the surface and add to the life of the seal. While you are adjusting the pump packing, be sure to try to come to the least acceptable rate of leakage. Overtightening the package is one of the most common ways to fail with the packing process. Any adjustment you make should be made in proportion to the rate of leakage. To learn more, please visit Dynapro for additional information, resources and references.

Modern Hydro Excavation Techniques Adopted by Top Hydrovac Companies in Canada


Hydro-Excavation is a streamlined digging process where high-pressure water is used to dig out dirt, moist soil, rocks, clay, gravel, and other earth debris through sucking up of the gathered debris into a large tank for disposal.

Development in Hydro-Excavation is the current excavation method used to dig out an area for different purposes. It is the internationally accepted safe excavation process for using nondestructive means to unearth debris for mining or construction proposes. Hydro excavation has been widely accepted as the most efficient method to use for such purposes.

The materials and equipment used to conduct a safe excavation process include;

  • Some pipe bedding tools
  • High pressured water to soften soil
  • An air compressor to break hard rocks into minute particles
  • A sand blaster
  • Long handle pneumatic tools to excavate

The History of Hydro Excavation
This technology dates back to 1960 when the use of catch basin cleaners was modified for hydro-excavation purposes. But the equipment at the time was simple as hydrovac companies continuously sort for new ideas to safely hydro excavate.

In the 70s and the 80s, customized large vacuum trucks and sewer pipes got adapted as suction excavator equipment. The 90s witnessed slow technological advancement of hydro-excavation machines while there was already a growing commercial demand for better, efficient hydro excavating equipment.

The new millennium came with a huge demand for change in the drilling industry. By this time, hydro-excavation was commonly used, and there was a rising demand by top service hydrovac companies in Canada and the U.S.

The growing demand for safer hydrovac and obligatory upgrading in workers safety are the key factors for change and enhancement of growth of the hydro excavation industry.

Financial Comparison of Hydro-Excavation to Conventional Digging

The modern outlook on current excavation methods compared to the old conventional ways is that the traditional method is expensive at the cost of soil removal only.

However, actual debris removing is small when compared to the entire cost of the complete excavation job. Little financial costs favor the Hydro excavation process due to its reduced risk of damage to the environment, the safety of workers and liability concerns.

The Process of Hydro Excavation
The most obvious part of this process is the safe removal of the earthen matter by use of vacuum pressured water. The super fast removal of debris minimizes pollution to the surrounding areas. The creation of a direct path to the excavation area ensures workers remain on high ground while hydro excavation is done using modern machinery. The method is non-destructive to the original landscape and it takes less time to restore the top earth layer.

Ga. port officials promise to protect ancient oaks

SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — Across from a paved lot where the Port of Savannah stacks empty cargo containers stands a living link to the time before Georgia’s first settlers arrived — an ancient live oak tree more than 7 ½ feet in diameter with massive branches extending up to 70 feet from its trunk.

Farms are focus of studies on drinking water toxin

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Scientists and farmers agree that phosphorus from agriculture runoff is feeding the blue-green algae blooms on Lake Erie linked to a toxin found in the drinking water of 400,000 people in Ohio and southeastern Michigan last week.

Ohio’s political leaders are calling for more studies to find out why the blooms are increasing and how to control them. A number of environmental groups say it’s time for strict regulations on the agriculture industry.

EPA suggests triggers for warning of algae in drinking water

TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is proposing guidelines to help state and local officials detect dangerous levels of algal toxins in drinking water.

EPA officials Wednesday released suggested thresholds that should prompt actions such as issuing do-not-drink warnings or taking steps to quickly reduce levels of two types of algal toxins. One set of trigger points was recommended for young children and another for the rest of the population.

Emerging solar plants scorch birds in mid-air

IVANPAH DRY LAKE, Calif. (AP) — Workers at a state-of-the-art solar plant in the Mojave Desert have a name for birds that fly through the plant’s concentrated sun rays — “streamers,” for the smoke plume that comes from birds that ignite in midair

Federal wildlife investigators who visited the BrightSource Energy plant last year and watched as birds burned and fell, reporting an average of one “streamer” every two minutes, are urging California officials to halt the operator’s application to build a still-bigger version.

The investigators want the halt until the full extent of the deaths can be assessed. Estimates per year now range from a low of about a thousand by BrightSource to 28,000 by an expert for the Center for Biological Diversity environmental group.

UN climate report offers stark warnings, hope

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — Climate change is happening, it’s almost entirely man’s fault and limiting its impacts may require reducing greenhouse gas emissions to zero this century, the U.N.’s panel on climate science said Sunday.

The fourth and final volume of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s giant climate assessment offered no surprises, nor was it expected to since it combined the findings of three reports released in the past 13 months.

Florida pushes forward with plan to open bear hunting season

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Florida is pushing forward on allowing limited black bear hunting for the first time in decades as part of an aggressive plan to manage the animals after four attacks in the past year.

On Thursday, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said its staff is putting together a hunting plan that it will review in April. Hunting could resume as soon as this fall.

Figueres says U.S. taking steps toward Paris climate deal

The head of the United Nations climate group on Sunday praised the Obama administration’s plan to curb U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, in advance of talks next year that are to yield a new post-2020 international climate change accord.

Christiana Figueres, the executive secretary of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, pointed to the Environmental Protection Agency’s planned regulations on carbon emissions from existing power plants as a positive step.

“They’re actually doing quite well,” she said of the administration on the weekly Platts Energy Week television program. Noting the power plant limits, she added, “the U.S. is doing a very good job in preparing what all of the other countries are currently preparing,” in terms of national commitments toward a new deal.

Brazil scientists fear golden mussel threat to Amazon River

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The world’s mightiest waterway, the Amazon River, is threatened by the most diminutive of foes — a tiny mussel invading from China.

Since hitching its way to South America in the early 1990s, the golden mussel has claimed new territory at alarming speeds, plowing through indigenous flora and fauna as it has spread to waters in five countries. Now, scientists fear the invasive species could make a jump into the Amazon, threatening one of the world’s unique ecological systems.

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