Utilities

Xcel says Texas-Oklahoma power line completed

AMARILLO, Texas (AP) — Crews have completed a transmission line between the Texas Panhandle and Oklahoma as the first of two 345-kilovolt projects relying on expanded wind-generated power.

Xcel Energy officials on Thursday announced the 130-mile line between Hitchland, Texas, and Woodward, Oklahoma, is part of a $64 million partnership with Oklahoma Gas and Electric Company.

TXU: Customers unaffected by Energy Future bankruptcy, despite notices

Source: 
Forth Worth Star-Telegram

Customers of TXU Energy will see their service continue as normal, the company says, even though more than a million of them received a notice that was linked to the bankruptcy proceedings of the firm’s parent company Energy Future Holdings, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports.

NC regulator OK to exclude watchdog from Duke merger probe: Court

Source: 
Charlotte Business Journal

A state appeals court has ruled that North Carolina regulators were within their rights to exclude watchdog group NC WARN from a hearing examining whether the group was lied to about what would happen when Duke Energy bought Progress Energy two years ago, the Charlotte Business Journal reports.

Southern CEO talks ‘organized’ markets, Kemper gasification

Source: 
E&E

Tom Fanning, CEO of Southern Co., the utility with old fashioned vertical integration, talked about his market strategies, the new nuclear reactor his firm is planning to build in Georgia and its Kemper project, which will burn coal with reduced carbon emissions, in an extensive interview with E&E.

Inslee wants to wean electric utilities off coal

SEATTLE (AP) — With an abundant supply of hydroelectric power, Washington state currently gets less than 14 percent of its electricity from coal.

Gov. Jay Inslee wants to take that down to zero over time.

To wean the state off coal-generated power, the Democratic governor will have to persuade the state's three private electric utilities — Puget Sound Energy, Pacific Power and Avista Corp. — to reduce or eliminate electricity they get from plants in Montana and Wyoming.

Indiana panel OKs $670 million IPL plant upgrades

 INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana regulators have approved Indianapolis Power & Light Co.'s nearly $670 million plan to upgrade two of its power plants as part of a push to meet tougher environmental regulations.

The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission endorsed IPL's plan to build a $631 million natural gas turbine power plant near Martinsville. That 650-megawatt plant will replace six coal-fired power units IPL will retire in the face of new federal mercury and air quality standards.

Top creditors tilt at big parts of Energy Future’s financing plans

Source: 
The Wall Street Journal

In legal filings, some of the big holders of Energy Future’s debt say the company is trying to use complex financing plans to lock in creditors without offering them bankruptcy court protection, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Illinois watchdog issues warning about energy deals

Source: 
Chicago Sun-Times

The Illinois Citizens Utility Board says deals urging customers to switch electricity suppliers may promise low rates but deliver extra fees, although two companies cited in the panel’s report blamed price spikes on severe winter weather, the Chicago Sun-Times reports.

Fla. Gov. and Cabinet asked to OK nuclear plant

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida Gov. Rick Scott and the three members of the Cabinet are being asked to approve two nuclear reactors for South Florida.

Scott and the state's three other elected officials on Tuesday will decide whether Florida Power & Light should be allowed to add two nuclear generators at its existing Turkey Point facility near Homestead. The project would add approximately 2,200 megawatts of power or enough for an estimated 750,000 homes.

Kansas considers revised permit for coal plant

TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — The state's top environmental regulator is considering whether to clear the way again for a new coal-fired power plant in southwest Kansas, but environmentalists contend that Gov. Sam Brownback's administration is taking short cuts to ensure that the $2.8 billion project is built.

Sunflower Electric Power Corp. needs a pollution-control permit from the state Department of Health and Environment for its proposed 895-megawatt plant outside Holcomb in Finney County, where the Hays-based utility already has another coal-fired plant. It obtained a permit in December 2010, but eight months ago, the Kansas Supreme Court ordered the department to revise it to impose tougher air-quality standards.

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