Solar

China calls for fair resolution of fight over solar panels

Source: 
Reuters

China is calling for talks to resolve the trade dispute with the U.S. over solar panels, Reuters reports.

U.S. to move on trade dispute over Chinese solar products using Taiwanese parts

Source: 
Reuters

The U.S. International Trade Commission found cause to believe that imports of Chinese solar equipment made with Taiwanese parts would harm the U.S. solar industry, clearing an early hurdle toward extending import duties to such products, Reuters reports.

Huge US thermal plant opens as industry grows

PRIMM, Nevada (AP) — A windy stretch of the Mojave Desert once roamed by tortoises and coyotes has been transformed by hundreds of thousands of mirrors into the largest solar power plant of its type in the world, a milestone for a growing industry that is testing the balance between wilderness conservation and the pursuit of green energy across the American West.

The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, sprawling across roughly 5 square miles (13 sq. kilometers) of federal land near the California-Nevada border, formally opened Thursday after years of regulatory and legal tangles ranging from relocating protected tortoises to assessing the impact on Mojave milkweed and other plants.

"The Ivanpah project is a shining example of how America is becoming a world leader in solar energy," U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz said in a statement after attending a dedication ceremony at the site. "This project shows that building a clean-energy economy creates jobs, curbs greenhouse gas emissions and fosters American innovation."

Trade commission to decide on duty on Chinese solar products

Source: 
Bloomberg

The U.S. International Trade Commission will soon make a preliminary decision on whether or not to pursue a complaint that alleges imports of solar products from China and Taiwan hurt U.S. companies, Bloomberg reports.

Huge thermal plant opens as solar industry grows

PRIMM, Nev. (AP) — A windy stretch of the Mojave Desert once roamed by tortoises and coyotes has been transformed by hundreds of thousands of mirrors into the largest solar power plant of its type in the world, a milestone for a growing industry that is testing the balance between wilderness conservation and the pursuit of green energy across the West.

The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, sprawling across roughly 5 square miles of federal land near the California-Nevada border, formally opens Thursday after years of regulatory and legal tangles ranging from relocating protected tortoises to assessing the impact on Mojave milkweed and other plants.

The $2.2 billion complex of three generating units, owned by NRG Energy Inc., Google Inc. and BrightSource Energy, can produce nearly 400 megawatts — enough power for 140,000 homes. It began making electricity last year.

FWS faces pressure to address potential eagle kills at Wyoming wind farm

Source: 
National Journal

The American Bird Conservancy and the Biodiversity Conservation Alliance in a letter urged the Fish and Wildlife Service to slow its approval process for a 1000-turbine Power Company of Wyoming wind farm, projecting the plant would kill as many as 64 golden eagles each year, National Journal reports.

Ivanpah solar station's tech draws scrutiny on evidence of bird kills

Source: 
The Wall Street Journal

NRG's Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating Station in California, a first-of-its-kind solar farm set to open today with a speech from Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz, has come under scrutiny after evidence has linked its tower-and-mirror technology to bird deaths, The Wall Street Journal reports.

NRDC, utilities join forces to support rooftop solar

Source: 
Bloomberg

The Natural Resources Defense Council and the Edison Electric Institute, a trade group representing utilities, announced a cooperative effort in support of a new rate system that would have rooftop panel owners and utilities compensate one another for electric generation, Bloomberg reports.

US trade protest over India solar energy program

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. brought a trade complaint against India Monday over a solar energy program it says discriminates against American manufacturers, adding another wrinkle to a bilateral relationship strained by the recent arrest and strip-search of an Indian diplomat.

It is the second time in a year that Washington has requested dispute settlement consultations with India over the program that it contends violates World Trade Organization rules by requiring suppliers use Indian-manufactured solar cells and modules.

U.S. officials say the trade case was in the works long before the December arrest of India's deputy consul general in New York, Devyani Khobragade, who was accused of visa fraud and under-paying her maid. In a compromise, Khobragade was indicted then deported in January, and both governments say they want to repair the relationship.

Branson hosts renewable energy summit in Caribbean

KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP) — Caribbean politicians and renewable power experts gathered Tuesday on British billionaire Richard Branson's private isle to discuss ways of transitioning to clean energy in an effort to spur small island nations to slash their dependence on fossil fuels and prepare for the impacts of climate change.

Branson, the CEO and founder of the Virgin Group of companies, is hosting a three-day meeting of political and business leaders at Necker Island, his home in the British Virgin Islands where he has developed an exclusive eco-resort showcasing renewable energy technology.

The event is organized by the Carbon War Room, a nonprofit company Branson co-founded to promote cutbacks in greenhouse-gas emissions through smart private enterprise. It hopes to help small islands become carbon-neutral by accelerating commercial investment. Political delegations from 13 countries and territories, including several heads of state, are attending along with representatives from dozens of companies and multinational organizations.

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