Safety

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Oil

API, AFPM to give their take on new oil-by-rail rules

The public comment period on a new Transportation Department rule to boost the safety of oil shipments by rail ends Tuesday, with industry groups set to reiterate their stances that Bakken crude can be safely transported if properly classified and handled.

The American Petroleum Institute and the American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers were to file their comments by the deadline, and both planned to hold conference calls planned with reporters to highlight their views.

Oil

Oil industry offers crude-train testing standards

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The oil industry's lead trade group released new standards on Thursday for testing and classifying crude shipped by rail after prior shipments were misclassified, including a train that derailed in Canada and killed 47 people.

As with earlier orders from the federal government, the industry standards leave it to individual companies to decide how often to test crude in order to gauge its danger.

Oil

Bakken crude safe: Oil execs tell ND

Source: 
The Wall Street Journal

Bakken crude is safe enough that no further treatment is needed before it’s transported by rail, oil company executives told the North Dakota Industrial Commission Tuesday, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Oil

Fire at Brazil third-largest refinery injures 6

SAO PAULO (AP) — Brazil's state-controlled Petrobras oil company said six workers were injured in a fire at a refinery in the state of Sao Paulo.

Petrobras said in a statement it is investigating what caused Thursday's fire at the Henrique Lage refinery in the city of Sao Jose Campos. It is Brazil's third largest refinery, with a capacity to refine 250,000 barrels of oil per day.

Oil

Suit filed to force DOT to ban old tank cars

Source: 
The Hill

The Sierra Club, Earthjustice and ForestEthics have filed a lawsuit to force the Department of Transportation to ban older DOT-111 tank cars from carrying crude, in the wake of a spate of explosions and fires after derailments, The Hill reports.

Oil

High benzene exposure for fracking workers, study finds

Source: 
Los Angeles Times

Oil and gas workers who open hatches on top of tanks at well sites are exposed to a higher level of benzene than is considered safe by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, according to a study published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Oil

Rohrabacher: DOT oil train rules ‘stealth’ climate policy

Source: 
National Journal

Department of Transportation rules to tighten safety standards on oil trains is really a disguised Obama administration attempt to rein in fossil fuel development, climate change skeptic Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., told a senior DOT official at a hearing Tuesday, National Journal reports.

Oil

New rules to bar oil trains from being left unattended

Source: 
The Hill

Freight trains carrying crude oil will be barred from being left unattended, under new rules being proposed by the Department of Transportation intended to prevent runaway train disasters like the derailment in Lac-Megantic, The Hill reports.

Oil

House Science subcommittee hearing on Bakken crude safety

Washington, September 9, 2014, 2:00 pm

House Science, Space and Technology subcommittees hearing, "Bakken Petroleum: The Substance of Energy Independence." DOE Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy Christopher Smith, PHMSA Deputy Administrator Timothy Butters to testify.

Oil

Judge: BP's reckless conduct caused Gulf oil spill

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — BP acted "recklessly" and bears most of the responsibility for the nation's worst offshore oil spill, a federal judge concluded Thursday, exposing the energy giant to roughly $18 billion in additional penalties.

BP's market value plummeted by $7 billion after the ruling as its shares suffered their worst percentage decline in almost three years. By Thursday afternoon, company shares had fallen almost 6 percent to $45.05.

BP PLC, which vowed to appeal, already agreed to pay billions in criminal fines and compensation to people and businesses affected by the disaster. U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier's ruling that BP acted with "gross negligence" deals instead with civil responsibilities, and could nearly quadruple what the London-based company has to pay in fines for polluting the Gulf of Mexico.

The judge held a non-jury trial last year to apportion blame for the Macondo well spill, which killed 11 men on the Deepwater Horizon rig and spewed oil for 87 days in 2010.

He ruled that BP bears 67 percent of the blame, Swiss-based drilling rig owner Transocean Ltd. bears 30 percent, and Houston-based cement contractor Halliburton Energy Services is responsible for 3 percent.

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