Safety

7 injured in Mexico as they gather fuel near tapped pipeline

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Authorities in southern Mexico said Wednesday that seven people were injured by a fire that broke out as they gathered fuel left near an illegal pipeline tap.

The civil defense office in the Gulf coast state of Tabasco reported the injuries on its website. Photos from the scene showed at least two men with severe burns.

Oil

Evacuees allowed back after West Texas well blowout

Source: 
The Associated Press

A well operated by Tabula Rasa Energy that blew out last week, spewing hydrogen sulfide, has been capped and some 500 people evacuated from the area around it are being allowed to return home, The Associated Press reports.

Oil

Deadly truck crash causes smoky Portland railroad yard fire

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A semitrailer truck hauling fuel crashed into a parked railroad tanker on Sunday, sparking a fire that sent up plumes of black smoke visible for miles.

The truck driver was killed, and authorities continued to investigate the cause of the crash, Portland police said

Oil

No quick ruling on request to toss Oklahoma quake suit

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Two energy companies asked a judge Wednesday to throw out a lawsuit by an Oklahoma woman who claims she was injured in an earthquake caused by the injection of wastewater deep into the ground — a long-used method to dispose of the chemical-laced byproduct of oil and gas production.

The lawsuit by Prague resident Sandra Ladra alleges the companies are liable because they operated wastewater disposal wells that triggered the largest earthquake in state history, a 5.6-magnitude temblor that hit in 2011. Ladra, who claims the quake crumbled her two-story fireplace and caused rocks to fall on her legs and gash her knee, is among others who have similar lawsuits pending elsewhere in the country.

Oil

Oklahoma judge takes request to ditch quake lawsuit under advisement

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Two energy companies have asked a judge to dismiss a lawsuit filed by an Oklahoma woman who claims their practices caused an earthquake that injured her.

Lincoln County District Judge Cynthia Ferrell Ashwood took the matter under advisement after Wednesday's hearing.

Companies asking Oklahoma judge to toss earthquake lawsuit

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Two energy companies are asking a judge to throw out a lawsuit by an Oklahoma woman who claims she was injured in an earthquake caused by the injection of wastewater deep into the ground — a method used for decades by the industry to dispose of the chemical-laced byproduct of oil and gas production.

The lawsuit by Prague resident Sandra Ladra alleges the companies are liable because they operated the wastewater disposal wells that triggered the largest earthquake in state history, a 5.6-magnitude temblor that hit in 2011. Ladra, who claims the quake crumbled her two-story fireplace and caused rocks to fall on her legs and gash her knee, is among others who have similar lawsuits pending across the country.

Oil

Azerbaijan: 7 bodies found after oil rig fire, 23 missing

BAKU, Azerbaijan (AP) — Azerbaijan's state oil company, SOCAR, says searchers have recovered the bodies of six of the 29 workers missing after a fire swept through an offshore oil platform, bringing the confirmed death toll to seven.

The 23 still missing are also presumed dead. They were trying to evacuate the burning oil platform and were in a lifeboat that toppled into the Caspian Sea during a storm late Friday.

Oil

Azerbaijan: 29 still missing from burning oil platform

BAKU, Azerbaijan (AP) — Azerbaijan's state oil company SOCAR said Sunday that it was still searching for 29 workers missing after a fire swept through an offshore oil platform.

But in an acknowledgment that they were unlikely to be found alive, the company asked the four other countries who share the Caspian Sea to search their own territorial waters for bodies of the missing oil workers. SOCAR said notices were sent to the border guard services of Iran, Kazakhstan, Russia and Turkmenistan.

Oil

BP spill: Prosecutors drop manslaughter charges

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The Gulf of Mexico rig explosion that killed 11 workers and unleashed the nation's worst offshore oil spill also led to criminal charges against four BP employees, who faced prison time if convicted.

But the Justice Department's decision to drop manslaughter charges against two BP rig supervisors makes it increasingly likely that nobody will spend a day behind bars for crimes associated with the deadly disaster.

Oil

Manslaughter charges dropped for BP supervisors in oil spill

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Federal prosecutors dropped manslaughter charges Wednesday against two BP supervisors responsible for safety aboard the oil rig where an explosion killed 11 workers and caused the nation's worst offshore oil spill. The decision makes it increasingly likely that no one will serve jail time for the disaster.

U.S. District Judge Stanwood Duval Jr. agreed to the government's request and accepted Donald Vidrine's plea to his only remaining charge: a misdemeanor count of violating the federal Clean Water Act.

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