Politics

Polish prospective PM: Coal miner's daughter who rose up ranks

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — The conservative Law and Justice Party, which won Poland's general elections, has tapped Beata Szydlo to become the nation's next prime minister — the second woman in a row to hold the post. Here are key facts about the 52-year-old politician.

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STRONG CAMPAIGNER:

In the spring, Szydlo ran the presidential campaign of Andrzej Duda, then a little-known figure who pulled off a shock upset of the widely-favored incumbent.

Gov. Walker reverses on Alaska natural gas tax

Source: 
Juneau Empire

Alaska Gov. Bill Walker has pulled his proposal to tax natural gas left in the ground after reaching agreement with ConocoPhillips and BP,  and possibly Exxon Mobil, the Juneau Empire reports.

Energyguardian photo

GOP set for two-pronged attack on ‘war on coal’

Republicans this week are set to launch a two-pronged attack against Obama administration regulations, as several members plan to introduce resolutions to overturn the Clean Power Plan and the Senate’s energy committee will grill a top Interior official over a proposed coal mining rule.

With Friday’s publication in the Federal Register of the Environmental Protection Agency’s power plant regulations, Congress will have 60 days to act against the rules via the Congressional Review Act. Lawmakers in both chamber on Friday announced plans to issue resolutions this week.

In the Senate, Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., intend issuing a resolution that would overturn EPA’s hard emissions limits for new fossil fuel plants.

Energy money has helped prospective Speaker Ryan

Source: 
E&E

Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., who’s expected to become the next House Speaker, has received recent contributions from a wide variety of energy companies, as well as the American Gas Association and Koch Industries Inc., E&E reports.

Battle lines drawn as carbon rule fight moves to courts and Congress

With the Environmental Protection Agency's final Clean Power Plan published in the Federal Register, more than two dozen states and and more than a dozen industry groups went to court Friday to overturn the plan, 15 states and two cities vowed to defend it, and lawmakers in both chambers of Congress readied votes to kill it.

The campaign to attack the regulations was met with a forceful response from the agency, which said the power plant carbon rules pass legal muster.

The rule for existing power plants, which require states to submit compliance plans to hit specific carbon reduction targets by 2030, is coupled with a rule setting hard emissions limits for new fossil fuel-fired plants. Combined, their goal is to cut sector carbon emissions by 32 percent from 2005 levels.

GOP candidates dominate guest lineups for Sunday news shows

WASHINGTON (AP) — Guest lineups for the Sunday TV news shows:

  • ABC's "This Week" — Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump.
  • NBC's "Meet the Press" — Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson.
  • CBS' "Face the Nation" — Republican presidential candidate Chris Christie; Reps. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., and Adam Schiff, D-Calif.
  • CNN's "State of the Union" — Trump; Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio; Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders.
  • "Fox News Sunday" — Carson; Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio.
Michael Bonfigli/The Christian Science Monitor

24 states, industry sue EPA over carbon rule

A coalition of 24 states and a mining industry group on Friday asked a federal appeals court to stay implementation of the Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Power Plan for existing plants and to review its legality.

The lawsuits, in the the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, come the same day the agency published its final power plant carbon rules in the Federal Register.

The head of the EPA said she is confident the rule will survive legal review.

Ryan pledges 'clean slate' as he seeks job of House Speaker

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. Paul Ryan, on his way to becoming speaker of the House and second in line to the presidency, says Congress must change its ways.

"We are not solving the country's problems; we are only adding to them," he says.

WHITE HOUSE PHOTO

Analysis: Obama passes carbon rules, climate legacy to the courts, successor

The Environmental Protection Agency's publication Friday of the final Clean Power Plan in the Federal Register formally moves the fate of President Barack Obama's signature climate policy to the courts and his successor.

The rules for existing plants, which require states to develop their own plans to reach specific carbon reduction targets, will come under swift legal fire from states and industry groups, which have been waiting to act since the rules were finalized August 3.

With the regulations published, those challenges can proceed, sending the landmark climate policy through a gauntlet of legal battles that’s anticipated to reach the Supreme Court.

Steyer promises no letup in campaign climate spending

Source: 
The Hill

Activist Tom Steyer says he’d be “shocked” if his climate action groups didn’t spend as aggressively in the 2016 elections as they did last year, and maintains they are “definitely” part of the process of getting Americans to take the issue of climate change more seriously, The Hill reports.

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