Hydraulic Fracturing/Fracking

Frackers showing concern over lawsuit risk from quakes

Source: 
The Wall Street Journal

The fracking industry is growing more concerned about lawsuits seeking damages because of earthquakes allegedly caused by the technique, The Wall Street Journal reports.

EPA reports on hundreds of fracking chemicals

Source: 
The Hill

Although sand and water are the primary substances used in fracking, an Environmental Protection Agency analysis of data from FracFocus.org found that nearly 700 chemical additives appear as well, according to The Hill.

EnergyGuardian photo

Interior fracking rule takes bipartisan beating

Calling it “frustrating,” “terrible” and “distressing,” Democrats and Republicans on Thursday ripped into the Interior Department's new rule on hydraulic fracturing as they heard testimony from the director of the Bureau of Land Management.

At a hearing of a House Natural Resources subcommittee, there was bipartisan dissatisfaction as lawmakers told BLM Director Neil Kornze that the rule was misguided – with Republicans calling the rule a unnecessary burden to industry and Democrats decrying it as too weak on environmental protection.

Maryland legislature moves toward fracking moratorium

Source: 
The Associated Press

Both chambers of Maryland's legislature voted Tuesday to impose a three-year moratorium on hydraulic fracturing, The Associated Press reports.

Associated Press

Interior fracking rule takes fire from both sides

The Interior Department's final rule regulating the use of hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas on federal and tribal lands met swift legal and legislative pushback from industry groups and congressional Republicans Friday. They said it would hinder energy development and infringe on established state regulatory systems.

But on the other side, Democrats and environmental groups raised concerns that the move didn't go far enough to protect public lands from the oil and gas extraction process.

Interior finalizes regulations for fracking on federal lands

The Interior Department on Friday unveiled a final rule governing hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas on federal and American Indian lands.

The rule, issued by the Bureau of Land Management, will require companies using the process to strengthen wells with concrete barriers to prevent water zones; disclose the chemicals used to the online FracFocus database; and secure recovered waste fluid with stronger interim storage tanks.

Major players giving up on foreign shale

Source: 
The Wall Street Journal

Chevron Corp., Exxon Mobil Corp. and Royal Dutch Shell PLC have virtually given up on shale drilling outside of the U.S. after spending more than five years and billions of dollars in the effort, The Wall Street Journal reports.

North Carolina waits for drillers as fracking permitted

Source: 
Tribune News Service

Some residents expect drilling could begin in North Carolina as early as this year now that the state has ended its long-standing moratorium on fracking, although plans for exploration efforts thus far have failed to raise enough funding, Tribune News Service reports.

NY towns consider seceding to Pa. over fracking ban

CONKLIN, N.Y. (AP) — Plenty of people leave New York state but in a job-hungry stretch of upstate, folks talk about staying put and seceding to Pennsylvania.

Local officials stung by a recent decision to ban natural gas fracking have raised the idea of redrawing the Keystone State's border. Even though they don't expect it to happen, members of the Upstate New York Towns Association hope the specter of secession will result in something — anything — good for a struggling part of the state peering enviously over the state line.

Orphan wells could be costly shale boom legacy

Source: 
The Wall Street Journal

The cleanup costs to states for abandoned wells – a burden they’re not well equipped to take on – could skyrocket as lower oil prices take some of the steam out of the shale drilling boom, The Wall Street Journal reports.

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