Electricity

HVDC power lines to support grid as coal-fired plants close

Source: 
E&E

As coal-fired plants retire in the face of stiffer Environmental Protection Agency regulations, high-voltage direct-current power lines can ensure grid reliability by transporting clean electricity from long-distance sources like Canadian hydropower, E&E reports.

Renewables don’t mean higher bills: Study

Source: 
The Denver Post

A study of 20 states across the country has found no link between renewable energy and increased electricity prices, The Denver Post reports.

Oil

You can go home: Returnees to ND oil boom town here to stay

WATFORD CITY, N.D. (AP) — Before oil tanker trucks rumbled down the roads at all hours, this town was so quiet that Erin White rode her horse to a deserted Main Street one night. Back then, this was a dusty hamlet with few prospects for a future.

Like many teens, White didn't expect to be back after college. She and her husband, Lange, settled in eastern Colorado. But when his temporary stint as an airplane mechanic ended, he needed work. White's parents weighed in: There were lots of oil jobs back home.

Indiana regulators open investigation into manhole blasts

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Utility regulators ordered an investigation into an Indianapolis power company's network failures Friday, a day after a series of underground explosions sent manhole covers hurtling through the air in a heavily traveled section of the city's downtown.

The Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission convened a brief emergency meeting to announce the investigation. Similar probes were ordered after blasts in 2011, including one that rattled the Statehouse, and last year.

Eclipse doesn’t dim European power grids

Source: 
Reuters

Grid operators in Europe -- and in Germany, in particular -- said they successfully managed the challenge of keeping the power on despite the eclipse that disrupted the supply of solar energy Friday, Reuters reports.

Better regulation, infrastructure helped winter power picture: FERC

Source: 
Platts

Regulatory reforms and infrastructure improvements helped keep a lid on electricity and natural gas prices this winter, officials said at the monthly meeting of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Thursday, Platts reports.

Underground blasts fire Indianapolis manhole covers into air

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Underground explosions caused by electrical arcing shot manhole covers into the air at a busy downtown Indianapolis intersection on Thursday, disrupting commuters, closing businesses and raising concerns about safety as the city prepares to host the Final Four next month.

Indianapolis Power & Light officials said Thursday that the arcing — electrical current jumping a gap in a circuit — occurred in 120-volt underground cables and caused the system to short-circuit.

Edison Foundation event on technology and electric systems

Washington, March 19, 2015, 12:00 pm

The Edison Foundation Institute for Electric Innovation hosts event featuring talks from industry leaders on how technology and policy are transforming electric systems.

WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Carbon rule hearing highlights sharp differences in state cost outlooks

There were sharp differences over how electric rates will be affected by the Environmental Protection Agency's Clean Power Plan, as state regulators testified on the economics of the proposed plan to cut carbon emissions from existing power plants.

At Tuesday's hearing before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power, some state utility and environmental regulators painted a dire picture of the rule's economic impact on customers, but a Maryland utility regulator said utility customers can benefit price-wise from carbon reduction.

Major solar storm hits Earth, may pull northern lights south

WASHINGTON (AP) — A severe solar storm smacked Earth with a surprisingly big geomagnetic jolt Tuesday, potentially affecting power grids and GPS tracking while pushing the colorful northern lights farther south, federal forecasters said.

So far no damage has been reported. Two blasts of magnetic plasma left the sun on Sunday, combined and arrived on Earth about 15 hours earlier and much stronger than expected, said Thomas Berger, director of the Space Weather Prediction Center in Boulder, Colorado.

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