Climate Change

Bloomberg: China could take lead in addressing climate change

Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said China might become "the next pro-environmental leader in this world" and strongly defended many of his signature policies in a wide-ranging interview with Katie Couric.

Bloomberg's sit-down with the new Yahoo News global anchor, which debuted Friday, was his first major interview since leaving elected office in December. In it, the new United Nations special envoy addressed climate change, gun control, education and income inequality.

Gallup poll finds less concern over environment, little over climate change

Source: 
The Hill

Climate change ranks near the bottom of the list of Americans' worries and concern about environmental issues generally is declining, according to a Gallup Poll conducted March 6-9, The Hill reports.

Office of Sen. Mary Landrieu

Analysis: Dems hope climate all-nighter will rally their own

Senate Democrats took to the chamber floor Monday evening to talk up climate change and renew calls for action to cut carbon emissions. But missing from the show of solidarity were several moderates running for re-election, like Senate Energy and Natural Resources Chairwoman Mary Landrieu of Louisiana.

Age-old climate indicators under stress in high Bolivia

CUTUSUMA, Bolivia (AP) — For centuries, farmers in the fragile ecosystems of the high Andes have looked to the behavior of plants and animals to figure out what crops to grow and when.

If reeds dried up in the late summer, rainless weather lay ahead, they believed. If the Andean fox made a howling appearance, abundant rains were thought sure to come.

But increasingly erratic weather that scientists attribute to global warming is rendering their age-old methods less reliable, endangering harvests in a region where life is hard in the best of times.

Global warming disruption worsening, say science academies

WASHINGTON (AP) — Man-made global warming is worsening and will disrupt both the natural world and human society, warns a joint report of two of the world's leading scientific organizations.

The U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society, which is the national scientific academy of the United Kingdom, are releasing an unusual plain language report on climate change that addressed 20 issues in a question-and-answer format.

"People do have persistent questions all about climate change," said study author Ben Santer of the Lawrence Livermore National Lab in California. "This is a one-stop shop for many of those questions."

Supreme Court seems divided in climate case

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court appeared divided on Monday over the sole Obama administration program already in place to limit power plant and factory emissions of gases blamed for global warming.

The justices took on a small and complicated piece of the politically charged issue of cutting greenhouse gas emissions in an extended argument that included references to Dunkin' Donuts stores, football games and light bulbs. The examples were meant to illustrate the vast potential reach of the program, in its critics' view, or its limited nature, as the administration argued.

The court's liberal justices seemed comfortable with the scope of an Environmental Protection Agency permitting program that applies to companies that want to expand facilities or build new ones that would increase overall pollution. Under the program, the companies must evaluate ways to reduce the carbon they release. Carbon dioxide is the chief greenhouse gas.

Much-needed rain, snow to hit parched California

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Meteorologists forecast a pair of storms could dump several inches of rain on parched cities and croplands throughout California in the coming week, bringing welcome news to a state that has just endured its driest year in recorded history.

While the rain won't be enough to end the drought, the National Weather Service projected Sunday that the much-needed precipitation could nearly double the amount of rainfall in parts of Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area this year.

By next Saturday, the twin Pacific storms are expected to bring as much as 2 inches of rain to the coast and several feet of snow to the Sierra Nevada.

High court climate case looks at EPA's power

WASHINGTON (AP) — Industry groups and Republican-led states are heading an attack at the Supreme Court against the Obama administration's sole means of trying to limit power-plant and factory emissions of gases blamed for global warming.

As President Barack Obama pledges to act on environmental and other matters when Congress doesn't, or won't, opponents of regulating carbon dioxide and other heat-trapping gases cast the rule as a power grab of historic proportions.

The court is hearing arguments Monday about a small but important piece of the Environmental Protection Agency's plans to cut the emissions — a requirement that companies expanding industrial facilities or building new ones that would increase overall pollution must also evaluate ways to reduce the carbon they release.

Senate Environment subcommittee hearing on natural resource adaptation

Washington, February 25, 2014, 2:00 pm

Senate Environment and Public Works Oversight Subcommittee hearing, "Natural Resource Adaptation: Protecting Ecosystems and Economies." White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Director John P. Holdren, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Director Dan Ashe to testify.

UN chief counting on Bloomberg's help on climate

UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon said Friday that former mayor Michael Bloomberg helped reduce carbon emissions in New York and he is now counting on the billionaire philanthropist "to work for humanity" in his new job as United Nations Special Envoy for Cities and Climate Change.

The U.N. chief said he was counting on Bloomberg's "dedicated and visionary leadership" to help countries around the world address the climate change phenomenon.

Ban made the comments as he welcomed Bloomberg to U.N. headquarters for the first time since his appointment on Jan. 31.

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